Clean tech needs more women

The clean tech industry suffers from a chronic lack of women. The share of female employees in the sector is at 20 to 25 % in developed countries. But the industry needs all sorts of skills not just ‘hard hat’ disciplines.

We’ve had enough of you, John! Nothing personal, but this could be the reaction to the figures on gender imbalance in executive roles in the UK. “For every one female director
there are four directors named John” and “61 % of the top 100 UK energy companies have no women on their board at all”, says the blog of Good Energy. The clean tech industry suffers from a chronic lack of women as well. A report published in 2013 by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) estimates the share of female employees in the sector at 20 to 25 % in developed countries. Other than their male counterparts, most women are working in administrative and public relations positions.

Good Energy, a renewable electricity supplier in Britain, is an exception, thanks to its
founder and CEO Juliet Davenport. 50 % of the company board of directors, senior management team and staff are women. “You’ll probably find more women in renewables than in the traditional energy sector. But it is true that there are few female
role models around, and of course, there is the work-life balance issue,” says Davenport.

“There is also a wrongly-held assumption that if engineering or science isn’t your specialty, then the sector is not for you. But the industry needs all sorts of skills: good communicators, policy influencers, traders and and so on. It’s not all about ‘hard hat’ disciplines!” …

The full interview with Juliet Davenport was published on Sun & Wind Energy in December 2015. The publication is available on subscription. Photo: Juliet Davenport, CEO of Good Energy. Credit: Good Energy / kalory.co.uk.